Tag Archives: Peer

Adrienne Quertier

Reflective practice and empowering Social Workers to make the most informed decisions they can. To know themselves and what they bring in the way of beliefs and approaches, to be able to view their practice with distance while also empathising with clients. To do your best work in a structure that may not support that and the inherent tension that this creates for Social Workers. To advocate for our clients, to advocate for ourselves.

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Cherie Appleton

My supervision interest is in exploring, learning, supporting and contributing to building and maintaining/balancing ‘practitioner integrity and use of self’; My influencing supervisory frameworks include relational, solution focused, strengths based, appreciative inquiry, collaborative and holistic approaches with an applied systemic analysis.

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Diana McIntyre

6 years experience of community based social work, Lead Professional (Children’s Team), and therapeutic support with families, children, young people, and adults (health, mental health, sexual abuse, violence, trauma, anger); 2 years health social work (hospital and community based); 4 years secondary school counselling; 8 years teaching on the Massey University and Victoria of Wellington University Human Development and Counselling Team (Lecturer and Research Supervisor).

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Dr Margaret Pack

I am interested in trauma informed models for clinical supervision. I have published internationally on vicarious traumatisation and resilience and am interested in offering supervision for those social workers engaged in dealing their own responses to their engagement with trauma-informed work.

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Echo Bignall

Integrating theory and practice, utilising Kolb’s Learning Cycle and mindfulness in supervision to empower social workers to make the best decisions. Genuine interest in staff well-being and career development and co-working to develop individualised supervision templates through the use manaakitanga. Use of tikanga, championing voices and aspirations of whanau through modelling and leading. Use of wairuatanga through use of Maori frameworks. Use of kaitiakitanga, protection and recognition of Maori knowledge. Use of rangatiratanga to ensure Maori participation in all projects. Use of Te Reo, spoken, written, visual and waiata. Use of whakamanawa, by acting in mana enhancing ways. Use of whakapapa through strong and meaningful connections. Mokopuna focussed and ensuring voice of children and young people are heard.

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James Makowharemahihi

Clinical/Cultural Supervision; Leadership/Professional Development; Strength based, Solution focussed, Best practice, Youth sector, NGO Agencies, Grief/Loss, Cross Cultural, Case work working with Individuals, couples, whanau.

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Josephine Faragher

The tuakana, teina model represents my preferred style of 1-1 supervision incorporating narrative strengths based and reflective processesd to address self care/risk mitigation, continuing professional development and management of administrative responsibilities.
I offer indigenous insight, reflective practice and safe space to enhance cross cultural communication and aid transformative practice.

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Karen Cherry

Reflective practice, Bicultural practice, Risk management and safe practice, Conflict resolution, Managing stress and anxiety,
Competency based practice

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Lenka Rochford

Clinical supervision for social workers and care professionals. Individual and group supervision available.
Holistic, reflective, supportive.

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