Tag Archives: Trauma Grief Loss

Aroha McAsey

Mana Enhancing – fostering empowerment for professionals to deploy their authentic ‘self’ in working relationships, team dynamics and complexities. Group supervision where kotahitanga is enacted to solve problems and develop creativity. Developing the fundamental belief that practice ‘touch stones’ are as individual as the skill set a professional owns. Guidance to identify the work/personal life balance sought after by professionals embedded in meeting KPI’s, RBA’s and deadlines. Supervision in the ‘real’ world, connection with the great outdoors.

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Diana McIntyre

6 years experience of community based social work, Lead Professional (Children’s Team), and therapeutic support with families, children, young people, and adults (health, mental health, sexual abuse, violence, trauma, anger); 2 years health social work (hospital and community based); 4 years secondary school counselling; 8 years teaching on the Massey University and Victoria of Wellington University Human Development and Counselling Team (Lecturer and Research Supervisor).

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Diane Milne

My supervision practice centers around the balance of support and challenge, having a work/life and managing risk and develping plans (informally or formally) to help support the supervisee.

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Dr Margaret Pack

I am interested in trauma informed models for clinical supervision. I have published internationally on vicarious traumatisation and resilience and am interested in offering supervision for those social workers engaged in dealing their own responses to their engagement with trauma-informed work.

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Edwina Poynton

Strengths based resilience focused practice, assisting supervisees to recognise and build on their strengths and develop their practice and new approaches. Focus on reflective practice and systems, whilst ensuring safe, accountable and professional practice. Child centred, family focused practice. Change process and developing teams. Individual and group supervision. Online and telephone supervision.

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Jon Blackshaw

My style is an integration of of approaches that include client centred, systems based, ecological, resiliency, strengths, radical, empowerment, solution focussed, feminist, and constructive/ narrative approaches. I am also interested in exploring the bi-cultural partnership dynamic in supervision. My other interests include: the critical analysis of social services – business models and organisational cultures/ structures; good & ethical governance processes within local community trusts; and the New Zealand social and economic class systems. I also like drawing on whiteboards alot.

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Karen Brown

To promote and encourage the importance of bi and multi cultural practice. To tautoko practitioners to maintain a healthily safe and effective practice that is reflective of maintaining self care, safe cultural approaches and provides mana enhancing practices. Whanau ora kaupapa used in its correct context can enhance ones practice regardless of culture or gender. To maximise and understand the importance of a balanced practice that enhances both Maori and pakeha world view points. To tautoko their knowledge and personal ability to work within the practice competency and guidelines required by their personal whanau, roles and functions of their mahi and competency standards of their relevant professional bodies requires skill and tautoko combined.

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Lenka Rochford

Clinical supervision for social workers and care professionals. Individual and group supervision available.
Holistic, reflective, supportive.

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Madeleine Taylor

Supporting staff, managers and leaders to work within complex environments. Working with issues of grief and loss, negotiation, influencing, managing difficult behaviours -(yours and others). Empowering you to make the best decisions you can, for yourself, your clients and your organisation.

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