Tag Archives: Working with Wairua & Spiritual Elements

Cherie Appleton

My supervision interest is in exploring, learning, supporting and contributing to building and maintaining/balancing ‘practitioner integrity and use of self’; My influencing supervisory frameworks include relational, solution focused, strengths based, appreciative inquiry, collaborative and holistic approaches with an applied systemic analysis.

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Eliza Wallace

Advancing Bicultural practice frameworks, developing Māori Models, maximising potential and capacity

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Helen Simmons

Working alongside the supervisee to advance their supervision goals, I take a holistic supervisee-centred approach focusing on who they are and what they are bringing into the work at any given time. I seek to foster reflexivity in supervision and have particular interests in spirituality in practice, Treaty based practice, gender issues, work/life balance and using supervision as a forum for learning and transformation.

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James Makowharemahihi

Clinical/Cultural Supervision; Leadership/Professional Development; Strength based, Solution focussed, Best practice, Youth sector, NGO Agencies, Grief/Loss, Cross Cultural, Case work working with Individuals, couples, whanau.

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Jon Blackshaw

My style is an integration of of approaches that include client centred, systems based, ecological, resiliency, strengths, radical, empowerment, solution focussed, feminist, and constructive/ narrative approaches. I am also interested in exploring the bi-cultural partnership dynamic in supervision. My other interests include: the critical analysis of social services – business models and organisational cultures/ structures; good & ethical governance processes within local community trusts; and the New Zealand social and economic class systems. I also like drawing on whiteboards alot.

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Karen Brown

To promote and encourage the importance of bi and multi cultural practice. To tautoko practitioners to maintain a healthily safe and effective practice that is reflective of maintaining self care, safe cultural approaches and provides mana enhancing practices. Whanau ora kaupapa used in its correct context can enhance ones practice regardless of culture or gender. To maximise and understand the importance of a balanced practice that enhances both Maori and pakeha world view points. To tautoko their knowledge and personal ability to work within the practice competency and guidelines required by their personal whanau, roles and functions of their mahi and competency standards of their relevant professional bodies requires skill and tautoko combined.

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Mary Gray

My vision of supervision is to provide a supportive, nurturing and environment where a practitioner can develop a strong purposeful professional practice; deepen their reflective skills and insights; increase their habits of self –care and build resilience within a strong framework of ethical practice.
Recent practice has include themes of working with difference and culturally safe practice; maintaining ethical practice boundaries; managing self care within demanding work-place situations; recognising and drawing on theoretical frameworks for practice; managing and working with cross-disciplinary and team relationships.

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Rachael Brown

Strength-based practice; Child focused; Leadership and development of staff; Helping other to reach their full potential

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