Animal Abuse as a Significant Marker for Family Violence and At-Risk Children

Thursday, 26 April 2018 12.30-1.30pm

Powerpoint Presentation: TBA

Audio: TBA


Presenter Nicole Robertson

Webinar Presenter: Nicole RobertsonNicole Robertson B.S.W., (Uni. of Syd.) P.G.Dip.S.W., (Massey Uni.). Nicole is the National Targeted Interventions Manager, RNZSPCA. A Clinical Social Worker, Family Therapist and Dialectical Behaviour Therapist.  Nicole has held practice leadership roles in Child, Adolescent and Family Psychiatry, Multi-Systemic Therapy and NGO social services.

RNZSPCA Targeted Intervention was developed in response to an increasing body of research that examines the common roots of violence toward people and animals and is directed at establishing animal cruelty as early indicator of at-risk status in children.

 


New Zealand has the highest rate of family violence in the world and up to 76% of family violence includes the abuse of animals. Children who witness animal cruelty often have long term adjustment difficulties and may experience post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, complex loss and grief issues, guilt and shame and poor interpersonal skills. Intergenerational studies have found that children who witness animal cruelty in the family home are three times more likely to perpetrate animal cruelty as adults and five times more likely to perpetrate human violence. The SPCA has developed resources to assist professionals working alongside vulnerable children and their families to identify and understand animal abuse as a significant marker for family violence and at-risk children and adolescents.

The workshop invites the participant to consider companion animals in the assessment of family dynamics, to recognise animal maltreatment as an indicator of family violence or child abuse, and to assess the quality of the child/animal relationship to gain a comprehensive understanding of a child’s emotional capacity, social aptitude, and cognitive development.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will be able to:

  1. The inclusion of animals in the ecological assessment to inform assessment and intervention planning.
  2. Animal mal-treatment as a marker of family violence or child abuse
  3. Assessing the quality of the child/animal relationship to gain a comprehensive understanding of a child’s emotional capacity, social aptitude, and cognitive development

ANZASW Practice Standards 4,5,6 & 9, SWRB Core Competencies 3,8,6 & 4


Registration Link: https://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/007d3d