The Professional use of Social Media by Social Workers in Aotearoa New Zealand

Stanfield, Deborah (2019) Abstract The novelty of social media provides a “wide open” space for social work research. Multiple questions are accumulating about practice relevance, professionalism, technical and ethical competence. Social work ethicist, Frederic Reamer (2017), describes the advent of social media as warranting our “explicit and sustained attention,” and depicts the task ahead as “the newest frontier in social […]

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The Image of Child Protection Social Workers in the News & amongst Children’s Professionals

This research examines portrayals of child protection social workers in New Zealand news reporting and explores how child protection social workers are perceived by their colleagues in the children’s workforce. The research set out not only to assess perceptions, but also to gain insight into how they are formed and to consider their implications. To this end, the research also examined children’s professionals’ perceptions of news coverage and sought to better understand the factors that influence professionals’ attitudes towards child protection social workers. Finally, professionals from the children’s workforce were asked how helpful they believed referrals to child protection social workers would be for a range of problems.

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Constructing an Evidence-Informed Social Work Supervision Model

O’Donoghue, K. Wong Yuh Ju, Peace. Tsui, Ming-Sum. (2017) Taylor & Francis Online, pp348-358. This article aims to pragmatically construct an evidence-informed model of social work supervision from the research findings from social work supervision research. The proposed evidence-informed model consists of five key areas, namely, the construction of social work supervision, supervision of the practitioner, the supervision alliance, the interactional […]

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The Child Youth and Family Review: A commentary on prevention

Keddell, E. (2017). The Policy Observatory. Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University of Technology. 35p.
In this report, social work academic Dr. Emily Keddell critiques one aspect of the recent child protection services reforms: the prevention of child abuse and neglect. She highlights the points of tension between the way that child abuse is defined throughout the review process, the details of the proposed reforms, and the design of child protection systems.

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Current debates on variability in child welfare decision-making: a selected literature review

Keddell, E. (2014) Social Sciences, 3 (1), 916–940. 
This article considers selected drivers of decision variability in child welfare decision-making and explores current debates in relation to these drivers. Covering the related influences of national orientation, risk and responsibility, inequality and poverty, evidence-based practice, constructions of abuse and its causes, domestic violence and cognitive processes, it discusses the literature in regards to how each of these influences decision variability.

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