SWRB Core Competency 5: Research & Survey Participation Invites

Criteria:

  • Open

We hope social workers can help to complete our survey at this link: https://survey.sogosurvey.com/r/byg2yd. Respondents would spend about 15-20 minutes to complete the form. All information obtained would be anonymous and only reported at an aggregate level.

Background of study

As you know, Working from home (WFH) is not a new phenomenon. It has been an organisation practice to allow individuals an alternate choice of working arrangement, especially those who have commitments that require them to stay at home. However, the presence of coronavirus (COVID-19) has hastened the process, making WFH a norm more than an exception. Three months after the COVID-19 pandemic that shut down offices, many organisations have concluded that (WFH) is the next best alternative. Indeed, the coronavirus crisis imposed social distancing requirements, forcing companies around the globe to ask millions of workers to WFH (Bodewits 2020).

However, the public reaction has been strange. Many have been keen for WFH arrangements but came to the realisation that the idealised dream of WFH is looking less like the object of their desire. Many individuals have woken up from the fantasy of being able to do anything, anytime, anywhere. People have also realised that the office had some amazing perks, and WFH comes with a whole host of hidden costs and challenges, especially since WFH may be lingering for a prolonged period.

In New Zealand, it is the same too. Social workers, employers and communities are facing challenging circumstances in response to COVID-19. Though social workers are essential services, some may have to work from home especially during the lockdown. During these times, employers must provide support so that social workers can adopt flexible approaches to working without compromising their level of service to the clients, and of course, their own psychological well-being.

Purpose of the research

As such, it would be in every organisation’s interest to understand how WFH may influence the psychological behaviour of individuals, and if there are any ways to address this behaviour. On this note, few researchers have substantiated these relationships empirically. We want to find out what are the appropriate support that organisations can provide to facilitate social workers’ WFH experiences.

Link

As such, we hope social workers can help to complete our survey at this link: https://survey.sogosurvey.com/r/byg2yd. Respondents would spend about 15-20 minutes to complete the form. All information obtained would be anonymous and only reported at an aggregate level.

Outcomes

Once the report is ready, we would (1) contribute an article to the ANZASW e-Newsletter, and (2) conduct a CPD Webinar.

Ethical clearance

Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) has approved this study (HREC number HRE2020-0450). Should you wish to discuss the study with someone not directly involved, in particular, any matters concerning the conduct of the study or your rights as a participant, or you wish to make a confidential complaint, you may contact the Ethics Officer on (08) 9266 9223 or the Manager, Research Integrity on (08) 9266 7093 or email hrec@curtin.edu.au.’

Any enquiries, please contact me at kimlim.tan@newcastle.edu.au

Criteria:

 

  • Social, youth and/or community workers
  • Who have a minimum of two years’ experience in working with child offenders

.

Kia ora,

My name is Romy Heijnen. I am currently studying for a Master of Social Work at Massey University and am undertaking my thesis research. My supervisors are Dr. Nicky Stanley – Clarke and Associate Professor Kathryn Hay.

The purpose of this research is to explore how professionals support child offenders to be crime – free and achieve positive outcomes.

I would like to interview:

  • Social, youth and/or community workers
  • Who have a minimum of two years’ experience in working with child offenders

If this sounds like you, I would like to invite you to participate in this research by contacting me on 0210773551 or romyheijnen@gmail.com. I will then send you an information sheet and the interview guide.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Ngā mihi,

Romy Heijnen

Criteria:

 

  • Samoan practitioners working with Samoan youth offenders

.


Samoan youth offending in South Auckland is a topical issue where everyone has an opinion on what would work. This study examines the experiences of Samoan practitioners working with Samoan youth offenders in South Auckland and who themselves were former youth-at-risk (not necessarily with criminal convictions). This could include, but is not limited to, coaches, youth workers, mentors, social workers, pastors, youth leaders, community workers, teachers, teacher aides, supervisors, leaders, entrepreneurs, musicians, sportspersons, entertainers or an ex-offender advocate.

I am interested in your story and the changes you have made in your life and your motivations to work with Samoan youth offenders in South Auckland.  If this is you, then this project would welcome your contribution immensely as the telling of your story would be a compelling account that can motivate others thinking about becoming a social practitioner or are at a crossroad of life. Your story could also explain how best to work with Samoan youth offenders that could influence our current policies or the way we engage our Samoan youth.

All interviews will be conducted through Zoom. Firstly, you will be invited to be part of one of the focus group Talanoa/discussions where you share about your experiences as a Samoan social practitioner working with Samoan youth offenders in South Auckland. I am seeking a total of twenty participants. From the focus group Talanoa/discussion sessions, you may be asked if you would like to participate in an individual interview. Only ten participants who meet all the requirements of this study will be selected. Participants must have a current Police vetted clearance as well as be cleared to work with Samoan youth offenders under the Vulnerable Children Act 2014 from their respective organisation. For more information, please refer to the information sheet.

Project Contacts

If you are interested in this study and would like more information, please contact the researcher Jack Scanlan on mobile 021562792 or email j.scanlan@massey.ac.nz All communication will be treated confidentially.

Fa’afetai Tele lava – Thank you very much.

Jack Scanlan
Doctor of Social Work Candidate
Massey University

Criteria:

  • Social service practitioners who have worked in any capacity with clients who have served prison sentences for child sex offences.

Kia kotou katoa

My name is Laura and I am in my final year of the Masters Applied Social Work at Massey University.

My final research project is aiming to explore successful community reintegration for child sex offenders post-incarceration.

To do this I’m wanting to speak to social service practitioners who have worked in any capacity with clients who have served prison sentences for child sex offences.

The aims of the project are to:

1)    Identify the barriers faced by child sex offenders as they reintegrate into the community post-incarceration

2)    Identify what makes community reintegration successful

3)    Consider how we are meeting the needs of child sex offenders in the community

I am based in Auckland and am happy to meet via Zoom with people from any part of New Zealand or in-person around the Auckland region at a time that suits you.

If you are interested please contact me via email: laurakearton@gmail.com

Ngā Mihi Nui,

Laura Kearton

Criteria:

    • Community and/or social workers
    • Living in communities with less than 6000 people
    • Work alongside women and/or families who are victims of intimate partner violence and require temporary accommodation (less than a week).

My name is Alisa Brown. I am currently in my final year of the Master of Applied Social Work degree at Massey University. As part of the requirements for this degree, it involves completing a research project.

The purpose of my research project is to explore the challenges faced by social work professionals tasked with finding suitable temporary accommodation for women, who have been victims of intimate partner violence in rural New Zealand.

I am looking for:

  • community and/or social workers
  • living in communities with less than 6000 people
  • work alongside women and/or families who are victims of intimate partner violence and require temporary accommodation (less than a week).

If you fit within these criteria, I would like to invite you to take part in this project by contacting me on my cell 0278387296 or by email at alisa.brown.1@uni.massey.ac.nz

I look forward to hearing from you,

Nga Mihi,

Alisa Brown

Criteria:

  • Registered frontline social workers who have an experience of working with the victims of intimate partner violence.
  • Supervisors who are registered social workers and supervise the frontline staff who work with the victims of intimate partner violence.

Kia ora

We would appreciate your participation.

The researchers for this project are Kavisha Mann (student researcher), Supervisors: Professor Liz Beddoe (Principal Supervisor) and Dr. Irene De Haan (Co-supervisor) at the University of Auckland.

About the project: This research is undertaken as part of PhD in social work at University of Auckland. The project will explore the impact (both positive and negative) on social workers of working with the victims of Intimate Partner Violence.  The project will study experiences of violence and aggression that the social workers are exposed to while working in this area and the impact of these experiences. It will further study of the coping mechanisms that can be used to address these challenges. It will also study how supervision can address the issues faced by social workers.

The findings of research will elaborate on the consequences for social workers of working with people experiencing family violence and the challenges that they face. It aims to provide useful information to IPV service organisations on challenges that are experienced by social workers and how to care for them.

Participating in the study will involve participation in a Zoom/Skype interview lasting for 60 minutes. A follow up interview on Zoom/Skype of 30 minutes may be conducted depending on the consent and convenience of the participants.

If you are interested, please contact me, Kavisha Mann, at kman992@aucklanduni.ac.nz and I will email a participant information and a consent form to you.

For any queries regarding ethical concerns you may contact the Chair, The University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee, The University of Auckland, Research Office, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142. Telephone 09 373-7599 extn. 83711; email:  humanethics@auckland.ac.nz

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 1 July 2020 for three years until 1 July 2023   Reference Number 024339

Criteria:

  1. Foster care experienced young people participants aged between 18 to 25 years of age.
  2. Key Informants who are working in the area of providing Transition Services, who are assisting/supporting young people to transition/journey out of foster care toward adulthood.

Young People Participants : I am seeking foster care experienced young people participants (aged between 18 to 25years of age) to take part in a research study which seeks the views and experiences of young people, their caregiver/s and their social workers. The aim of the research is to examine the perceptions of the elements, characteristics and attributes that contribute to ‘perceived success’ for young people as they journey out of the foster care system.

Key Informants. I am also wanting to interview Key Informants who are working in the area of providing Transition Services, who are assisting/supporting young people to transition/journey out of foster care toward adulthood.

Each interview will take up to one and a half hours

If you are interested or if you have some connections (know of somebody that may be interested), please contact:

Nathan Jaquiery, Social and Community Work, University of Otago: Ph 03 479 8603
Email: nathan.jaquiery@otago.ac.nz

Dr Emily Keddell, Social and Community Work, University of Otago: Ph 03 479 5867
Email: emily.keddell@otago.ac.nz