Bernice Tyree

Bernice is inspired by this karaka:
Discussion brings forth understanding
Understanding brings forth light
Light brings forth wisdom
Wisdom brings forth wellness.

Her sessions aim to empower through collaboration. Bernice is able to assist supervisees who practice in a wide range of professional settings: She is a reflective practitioner with experience supporting clients with emotional difficulties including trauma, grief, depression, PTSD, anxiety, panic, woman’s wellness and personal sensitive issues, anger, family violence, employment issues, career change, relationship stress, separation, disability, diversity and issues affecting LGBT community, immigration and other life transition difficulties including gender crisis and living with the effects of HIV, and palliative care. Bernice relates well to people across a range of cultures, ages, beliefs and is committed to promoting safer communities for our family/whanau to live and flourish. She enjoys connecting with individual supervisees and invites them to talk freely as a way of understanding and making sense of challenging work situations. She promotes supervision as a pathway to safe practice and professionalism. She adheres to client confidentiality and the values promoted by the Social Workers, Code of Ethics.

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Shane Kennard

My interests are the development of practice competence, issues of social justice, recognising potentially unsafe practice and facilitating the learning potential in all of us. I bring a Maaori worldview and a lived experience of most social issues affecting NZ society, with a focus on critical reflection in supervision as the catalyst for transformative learning.

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Kirsty McLaughlin

Providing one -to -one supervision with the ultimate purpose of enhancing the quality of practice.
Together: Utilising critical reflective practice techniques, exploring how different options & actions may work, making choices and goal setting, identifying specific commitments to action.
Friendly and focused.100% confidential.

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Mandy Lewis

– Reflective practice including strengths based and solutions focused support;
– Working around team dynamics and ‘group think’ processes for positive outcomes;
– Supporting professional development, empowerment processes and potential for change and growth;
– Incorporating and supporting healthy connections re mind and body;
– Interest in Tikanga Maori practice, indigenous models of practice and understanding of unconsious bias;
– Attachment theory processes to facilitate positive future outcomes.

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Rae Boyd

Adaptive supervision using individualized professional plans
Empowering approaches aimed at best practice
Support becoming registered
External supervision

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Liz Langham

I am passionate about the empowering impact of effective social work practice at all levels, from the micro-skills of counselling and therapeutic intervention through to the macro-levels of policy. I am interested in the relationship between these different levels of practice and find that I am skilled at identifying the relationships between individuals, groups, contexts, systems and culture and the influence these have on each other. I have an appreciative inquiry approach to my supervision practice, looking at what is working well and building on that, as well as helping people to identify where they would like additional supports or could benefit from making stronger connections to theories, resources or networks. Navigating personal and professional identity as well as supporting safe and effective practice would be a focus of our time together.
I may have some low-cost vacancies for those working in the voluntary sector or on very low wages in the community sector. Please enquire.

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Sheryl Egglestone

Seeking what the implications are and how this impacts on the supervisee. I am also interested on how this can be explored through analyzing the issue, from a professional perspective.
I want the supervisee to feel safe and can rely on the supervisor to support them in their decision making. There needs to be room for the supervisee to articulate and identify the issue using a reflective model of practice to implement a plan for the client

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