Deborah Sharma

Provide a non-threatening environment as well as appropriate supervision tool to help build reflective practice.
Provide professional supervision theory and practice including Strengths-based Supervision, discussion and feedback on areas that may need further development.
Utilise technology in the supervision context.
Provide group supervision.
Utilise appropriate Supervision Model to support the supervision process and relationship.

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Deanna Hollis

Trauma focused interventions, with a specialist approach to harmful sexual behaviour; risk management and safe practice; leadership and management development; encouraging reflective practice and client centred interventions. The assessment, treatment and case management of harmful sexual behavior in children, youth and adults.

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Carol Penfold

I endeavour to use the Te Whare Tapa Wha Model of Maori Health to help promote and understand the meaning of biculturalism, multiculturalism, personal Identity and emotional wellbeing in this ever changing world.
I encourage critical thinking and reflective practice in both myself and others and my aim for us all is a Healthy Life Balance. Maintaining integrity and personal mana in the workforce by building sustainable relationships is also of high interest to my practice.

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Bianca Johanson

Kia ora! I am a warm, approachable senior social worker who understands the pitfalls and dynamics of the social work field. My focus is on supervision being about you as the practitioner, creating balance in your life and self care. We can explore any issue that you would like to bring to supervision to unpack and reflect and develop your social work practice. I am a Maori supervisor and position myself strongly within a bicultural approach when working with you. Nga maanaaki.

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Hariata Unu

Mana Enhancement and Te Whare Tapa Wha models of practices.Bicultural, reflective supervision practice.I utilize Te Ao Turoa, Te Ao Mārama and Te Ao Wairua in my practice and approach.
Importance of being Māori and working in a multi-cultural society has led to enhancing and effective interactions with Whānaungatanga being the key to positive interactions and outcomes.

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Bernice Tyree

Bernice is inspired by this karaka:
Discussion brings forth understanding
Understanding brings forth light
Light brings forth wisdom
Wisdom brings forth wellness.

Her sessions aim to empower through collaboration. Bernice is able to assist supervisees who practice in a wide range of professional settings: She is a reflective practitioner with experience supporting clients with emotional difficulties including trauma, grief, depression, PTSD, anxiety, panic, woman’s wellness and personal sensitive issues, anger, family violence, employment issues, career change, relationship stress, separation, disability, diversity and issues affecting LGBT community, immigration and other life transition difficulties including gender crisis and living with the effects of HIV, and palliative care. Bernice relates well to people across a range of cultures, ages, beliefs and is committed to promoting safer communities for our family/whanau to live and flourish. She enjoys connecting with individual supervisees and invites them to talk freely as a way of understanding and making sense of challenging work situations. She promotes supervision as a pathway to safe practice and professionalism. She adheres to client confidentiality and the values promoted by the Social Workers, Code of Ethics.

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Shane Kennard

My interests are the development of practice competence, issues of social justice, recognising potentially unsafe practice and facilitating the learning potential in all of us. I bring a Maaori worldview and a lived experience of most social issues affecting NZ society, with a focus on critical reflection in supervision as the catalyst for transformative learning.

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