Helen Barker Troughton

I welcome the whole person, work and home life, your emotional, physical, relational, spiritual being. I encourage and strengthen your way of being.
People say that they feel accepted, free to talk, hear themselves think. Hopeful for what they could do, who they are. Engaged, learning new things by readings and podcasts they get. I’m on their side, I’m for them, I’m interested in what they can do.
I can do online, phone or face-to-face in the Bay of Plenty.

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Ksenija Napan

Pinehill, Northshore Auckland; Female; Face to Face only
BSW & MSW; Master Degree in Social Psychiatry that involved assessed components related to supervision; PhD in Social work education that included regular monthly external professional supervision as part of integrative method of teaching learning social work that was a focus of my research; Erica Stern’s IPR supervision process; John Heron’s Peer supervision; Teaching a postgraduate course with David Epston called Reflecting on Practice; within Master of Social Practice course; NZ Coaching and mentoring centre – organised and participated in the Peer Supervision course three times (in three different settings) and participated in peer supervision groups (still participating)
Strengths based; Integrative; IPR (Interpersonal Process Recall); Peer, individual and group supervision; Reflective teams; Managing challenging situations with grace and integirity; Exploring how personal, professional, political and spiritual are related and how they reflect in professional practice; Cultural respectfulness; Ethical dilemmas
Animal assisted work and whole people learning including embodiment practice

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Jasmine Faiza

Holistic and cross cultural supervision. Strength-based and open to possibilities. Respectful and honor the journey of the supervisee and provide lots of options. Create a psychological safe environment and highly considerate of cultural needs.

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Mahala Reynolds

Female; BSC, Psychology (Canterbury); Dip Social Work (NMIT); Kaitiakitanga: PGDip Bicultural Professional Supervision (Te Wānanga ō Aotearoa)

My study at Te Wānanga in 2017 allowed development and consolidation of my own bicultural model of Kaitiakitanga and supervision interweaving Te Āo Maori values. The story of my ancestors of English and Tahitan descent help me to consider a bicultural journey as way to reflect on how we are to engage in relationships. Āta, Ako and Āhurutanga are the tenets to my model. I draw upon their lessons of careful deliberation, reciprocal learning, in developing a safe space. Growth, mana and transformation are central to the supervisory relationship and reflective practice core to this.

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Ina Mouton

14 years social work experience in care and protection, school social work, child and adolescent mental health, and foster care. I am very passionate about the social work as a profession and have also provided field work education to a number of social work students. As professional supervisor my aim is to provide a supervision space where supervisees can feel safe and supported to share and learn from their practice through reflection on practice. The supervision relationship is a joint venture that provides a learning journey for both supervisor and supervisee.
Reflective and strength based practice to support and empower social workers and care professionals to provide the best outcome for their clients.

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Glenda Light

Reflective practice and empowering social workers to make the best decisions they can. Working with team dynamics and managing complex situations. Risk management and safe practice. Group and peer supervision. Working with difference. Leadership and management development. Managing work/personal life balance. Integrating theory and practice. Culturally safe practice.
‘Lived experience’ and client-centred approach. Practice-based research.

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Sandra Druskovich

I deeply value the importance of the supervision relationship and the need to provide a safe, supportive space where there is the freedom to openly express your self – with the confidence that your voice will be heard in an empathic, confidential and non-judgemental setting.

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