Andrew Thompson

I am committed to creating a safe and contained supervision space, that provides an opportunity for you to critically reflect on practice, and at times consider the overlap with your personal life and experiences. The supervisory space can accommodate many issues; complex case work, professional development, team and colleague challenges, traumatic experience, personal crisis, professional goals, management and leadership, ethical questions, critical decision-making.
I have kept one foot in the practice world and another in the academic world, and I am keen to work with you on your professional and personal development goals. Working with children and families is tough work and I am interested in how we sustain high levels of practice, maintain wellbeing and have fun along the way.
I have been influenced by narrative therapy, strengths based practice, psychodynamic approaches and critical reflection. Core values for me are kindness, honesty and respect.

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Kyley Logan

I work with supervisees in linking theory to practice, working through ethical dilemmas, managing work/life balance, career progression and employment issues.
I’m interested in working with managers and frontline staff, particularly in the field of family violence, programme development, CBT and trauma based approaches.

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Julia Friedewald

I am particularly interested in supporting new graduates embarking on their social work careers through supervision which focuses on reflexive practice (reflecting on practice to engage in continuous learning), and translating all that theory you’ve learned at uni into practice!
My approach to supervision is collaborative and I understand how important it is to find the right ‘fit’ in supervision. I would welcome you to contact me to book in a free initial meeting to see if my style of supervision is a good ‘fit’ for you.

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Aroha McAsey

Mana Enhancing – fostering empowerment for professionals to deploy their authentic ‘self’ in working relationships, team dynamics and complexities. Group supervision where kotahitanga is enacted to solve problems and develop creativity. Developing the fundamental belief that practice ‘touch stones’ are as individual as the skill set a professional owns. Guidance to identify the work/personal life balance sought after by professionals embedded in meeting KPI’s, RBA’s and deadlines. Supervision in the ‘real’ world, connection with the great outdoors.

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Lisa Glynn

Reflective practice, collaborative processes, application of theory to practice, management and leadership in social services, establishing and maintaining boundaries.

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Pauline Tucker

Transference/counter transference, transmissions of oppression, self care, work/life balance, safe practice when working with risks, making sense of risk & what this means, team practice; model of supervision practice – reflective.

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