Jon Blackshaw

I attempt to bring a Holistic, Reflective, and Person-Centered approach to Clinical Supervision that often includes Solutions-Focused, Bi-cultural, Critical, Systems, Radical, Trauma Informed, CBT, Strengths-Based and Narrative Approaches.
I have a personal passion for creative grass-roots community development. I self-identify as a Christian Anarchist and in supervision I invite you to also stand in your own truth

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Carol Penfold

I endeavour to use the Te Whare Tapa Wha Model of Maori Health to help promote and understand the meaning of biculturalism, multiculturalism, personal Identity and emotional wellbeing in this ever changing world.
I encourage critical thinking and reflective practice in both myself and others and my aim for us all is a Healthy Life Balance. Maintaining integrity and personal mana in the workforce by building sustainable relationships is also of high interest to my practice.

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Jo Bader

Developing critically reflective practice, integrating theory and practice, boundary setting and maintaining alongside compassionate practice, macro thinking as well as fine tuning personal strengths and potential, systems thinking, whole person ie integrating body and brain responses, culturally sound practice.

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Hariata Unu

Mana Enhancement and Te Whare Tapa Wha models of practices.Bicultural, reflective supervision practice.I utilize Te Ao Turoa, Te Ao Mārama and Te Ao Wairua in my practice and approach.
Importance of being Māori and working in a multi-cultural society has led to enhancing and effective interactions with Whānaungatanga being the key to positive interactions and outcomes.

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Bernice Tyree

Bernice is inspired by this karaka:
Discussion brings forth understanding
Understanding brings forth light
Light brings forth wisdom
Wisdom brings forth wellness.

Her sessions aim to empower through collaboration. Bernice is able to assist supervisees who practice in a wide range of professional settings: She is a reflective practitioner with experience supporting clients with emotional difficulties including trauma, grief, depression, PTSD, anxiety, panic, woman’s wellness and personal sensitive issues, anger, family violence, employment issues, career change, relationship stress, separation, disability, diversity and issues affecting LGBT community, immigration and other life transition difficulties including gender crisis and living with the effects of HIV, and palliative care. Bernice relates well to people across a range of cultures, ages, beliefs and is committed to promoting safer communities for our family/whanau to live and flourish. She enjoys connecting with individual supervisees and invites them to talk freely as a way of understanding and making sense of challenging work situations. She promotes supervision as a pathway to safe practice and professionalism. She adheres to client confidentiality and the values promoted by the Social Workers, Code of Ethics.

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Shane Kennard

My interests are the development of practice competence, issues of social justice, recognising potentially unsafe practice and facilitating the learning potential in all of us. I bring a Maaori worldview and a lived experience of most social issues affecting NZ society, with a focus on critical reflection in supervision as the catalyst for transformative learning.

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Maureen van Venrooy

I work from a strengths based model of practice and believe that most people have their own answers, however they may need some guidance at times to become clear. I believe in empowering both clients and supervisees to make the best decision they can. I have a particular interest in homelessness and the many factors that may contribute to a person becoming homeless. I enjoy the opportunity to positively impact supervisees working lives, growth and development and to model good supervision relationships. I work from a reflective model of practice.

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