Rachel MacKinnon

I approach supervision from a reflective practice standpoint which is to offer a safe and exploratory environment for Social Workers to consider their practice and approaches and develop their social work skills in accordance with their own goals. I have a keen focus on self-care, work/life balance, safe practice and safe boundaries in the workplace.
I appreciate the value of professional supervision and the opportunities that this provides for individuals in their own self and professional development.
I offer face to face supervision and am also exploring the use of online supervision and welcome supervisees from anywhere within NZ.

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Jon Blackshaw

Ko Horokiwi tōku māunga. Ko Kenepuru tōku awa. Ko Kōtarana [East Glasgow] tōku iwi. Nō Porirua East ahau. Ko Horouta tōku marae.Ko Jon Blackshaw tōku ingoa.
I attempt to bring a Holistic, Reflective, and Person-Centred approach to Clinical Supervision that often includes Solutions-Focused, Bi-cultural, Critical, Systems, Radical, Trauma Informed, CBT, Strengths-Based and Narrative Approaches. Having worked across the health, education and social service state sectors I have experience in supporting people to navigate the org/client complexities there, and I am happy to support with CPD logs and Professional Development advice. I have also lived and worked in the Wellington /Hutt Valley/Porirua areas most of my life.
I am currently only able to offer Supervision appointments on Friday afternoons [between 12.30 and 3.30 pm]. Like any professional partnership, it’s best to meet up – see if we can find ‘common ground’ for supervision – and take it from there. Cups of tea /water/coffee come as standard.

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Bernice Tyree

Bernice is inspired by this karaka:
Discussion brings forth understanding
Understanding brings forth light
Light brings forth wisdom
Wisdom brings forth wellness.

Her sessions aim to empower through collaboration. Bernice is able to assist supervisees who practice in a wide range of professional settings: She is a reflective practitioner with experience supporting clients with emotional difficulties including trauma, grief, depression, PTSD, anxiety, panic, woman’s wellness and personal sensitive issues, anger, family violence, employment issues, career change, relationship stress, separation, disability, diversity and issues affecting LGBT community, immigration and other life transition difficulties including gender crisis and living with the effects of HIV, and palliative care. Bernice relates well to people across a range of cultures, ages, beliefs and is committed to promoting safer communities for our family/whanau to live and flourish. She enjoys connecting with individual supervisees and invites them to talk freely as a way of understanding and making sense of challenging work situations. She promotes supervision as a pathway to safe practice and professionalism. She adheres to client confidentiality and the values promoted by the Social Workers, Code of Ethics.

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Elizabeth Hamilton

Reflective practice, mentoring, health social work – casework, groupwork, education – and self care and resilience.
Older Persons’ Health; dementia; individuals’ and families’ response and adjustment to a neurodegenerative and/or terminal diagnosis; support of the primary carer; life transitions – how we navigate change, loss and grief with our clients and for ourselves; resilience building.

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Anne MacAulay

I use reflective practise and transformative supervision. I want to empower the social workers I work with to provide an excellent social work service to their clients, while also providing excellent self-care to themselves and continuing to broaden and deepen their own social work practice.

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Diana McIntyre

Strengths-based, solution-focused, critically reflective practice. Supporting social workers who work with children, young people, adults, and families in the community. Utilising developmental, interpersonal, environmental, and trauma-informed assessment approaches. Best-practice techniques in promoting resilience, recovery and healing. DBT and Mindfulness approaches. Assessment and intervention approaches for self-harm and suicidal risk. Supporting social workers working with survivors of sexual abuse; domestic violence; PTSD; Grief; Depression; Anxiety; physical/medical health; and mental health conditions

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