Ksenija Napan

Pinehill, Northshore Auckland; Female; Face to Face only
BSW & MSW; Master Degree in Social Psychiatry that involved assessed components related to supervision; PhD in Social work education that included regular monthly external professional supervision as part of integrative method of teaching learning social work that was a focus of my research; Erica Stern’s IPR supervision process; John Heron’s Peer supervision; Teaching a postgraduate course with David Epston called Reflecting on Practice; within Master of Social Practice course; NZ Coaching and mentoring centre – organised and participated in the Peer Supervision course three times (in three different settings) and participated in peer supervision groups (still participating)
Strengths based; Integrative; IPR (Interpersonal Process Recall); Peer, individual and group supervision; Reflective teams; Managing challenging situations with grace and integirity; Exploring how personal, professional, political and spiritual are related and how they reflect in professional practice; Cultural respectfulness; Ethical dilemmas
Animal assisted work and whole people learning including embodiment practice

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Mahala Reynolds

Female; BSC, Psychology (Canterbury); Dip Social Work (NMIT); Kaitiakitanga: PGDip Bicultural Professional Supervision (Te Wānanga ō Aotearoa)

My study at Te Wānanga in 2017 allowed development and consolidation of my own bicultural model of Kaitiakitanga and supervision interweaving Te Āo Maori values. The story of my ancestors of English and Tahitan descent help me to consider a bicultural journey as way to reflect on how we are to engage in relationships. Āta, Ako and Āhurutanga are the tenets to my model. I draw upon their lessons of careful deliberation, reciprocal learning, in developing a safe space. Growth, mana and transformation are central to the supervisory relationship and reflective practice core to this.

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Claire Mushrow

My supervision approach is based on strength based relational practice and acknowledges the inherent value, opportunities and challenges/risks of working within human services.
I believe self care, and professional development are essential aspects of social work practice as are the opportunities to reflect, enquire and make changes.
My approach encompasses appreciative enquiry, motivational interviewing and solution focused. I believe supervision is a doorway to possibilities, action and hope. It requires integrity, curiosity, clarity, openness from both the supervisor and supervisee.
I offer sessions with individuals and within group/peer supervision.
I appreciate working within cross cultural and multidisciplinary contexts.
I have a personal experience of neurodiversity so believe I can offer insight into this in a professional/work context

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Jacqui Dudley

I am a French European practitioner specialising in bi-cultural social work practices. I would welcome the opportunity to try and help support and supervise you with integrating tikanga Maori safely, within your social work practice.

I use a ‘strength based’ approach that focuses on the positive rather than the negative, building on potential, strengths and capabilities.

We will work together on self-care plans to assist you to bring about ‘balance’ within your social work practice and personal life. I will also support you with case management and your participation in group/team and whānau family dynamics, through the praxis of ‘Pleine Conscience’, a mindful reflection, and principled development of future conscious pathways, and look forward to navigating the complexities that occur in social work so as to further enhance your professional development.
I offer kanohi ki te kanohi face-to-face, telephone and zoom as supervisory mediums.
Please feel free to contact me to discuss yours and your organisation’s needs.

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Debbie O’Connor

When offering supervision I work from a strengths based perspective with the aim to empower the individual to work from a place of confidence and to become the best version of themselves. I always take an holistic approach that will be in line with what the clinician need at a given time but that also meets the needs of where the clinician is at in the career and/or education.
Personally, a value supervision that is a balanced mix between support/debriefing and broadening my clinical scope and knowledge.

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Glenda Light

Reflective practice and empowering social workers to make the best decisions they can. Working with team dynamics and managing complex situations. Risk management and safe practice. Group and peer supervision. Working with difference. Leadership and management development. Managing work/personal life balance. Integrating theory and practice. Culturally safe practice.
‘Lived experience’ and client-centred approach. Practice-based research.

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Sandra Druskovich

I deeply value the importance of the supervision relationship and the need to provide a safe, supportive space where there is the freedom to openly express your self – with the confidence that your voice will be heard in an empathic, confidential and non-judgemental setting.

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