Jay Indik

Currently the Lead DBT therapist at Te Whare Mahana and private practice . Available by videoconferencing or in person in Takaka. 25 years of social work DBT, somatic experiencing, narrative family therapy, supervision, self-care, psychodynamic, integrating Whanau Ora and other therapy practices, art therapy, leadership, parent and child/adolescents . Help you shine, learn, be effective and take care of yourself

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Tina McTear

Supporting Social Workers to enhance systemic practice, work with complex family dynamics, help clients to think relationally and further skills in working with more than one family member at a time. Using an attachment and developmental lens to enhance relationships between parents/caregivers and children. Extending skills in the management of suicide risk, self-harm and other mental health concerns, particularly for adolescents. Supporting professional development and healthy workplace relationships.

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Christine Hoseason

My interests in supervision are:
• Having a strengths based resilience focused approach to practice
• Reflective practice as it enables more accountable practice within the field of Social Work
• Having a deep understanding of the complexities when working within a diverse team and the different dynamics that can bring
• Life balance between work and personal wellbeing

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Debbie O’Connor

When offering supervision I work from a strengths based perspective with the aim to empower the individual to work from a place of confidence and to become the best version of themselves. I always take an holistic approach that will be in line with what the clinician need at a given time but that also meets the needs of where the clinician is at in the career and/or education.
Personally, a value supervision that is a balanced mix between support/debriefing and broadening my clinical scope and knowledge.

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Joel Brittenden

In supervision I encourage reflective practice to explore ethical, boundary and practice issues whether the supervisee is young in their career or well established.
Choosing a new supervisor can be difficult, I’m happy to meet and discuss what supervision might look like over a coffee with no obligation to continue.

Areas of experience and interest:
-Mental Health
-Community and residential work
-Leadership and managing teams
-Faith based NGO’s
-Working with refugees
-Trauma informed care
-Peer supervision
-Social services working in the education sector

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Glenda Light

Reflective practice and empowering social workers to make the best decisions they can. Working with team dynamics and managing complex situations. Risk management and safe practice. Group and peer supervision. Working with difference. Leadership and management development. Managing work/personal life balance. Integrating theory and practice. Culturally safe practice.
‘Lived experience’ and client-centred approach. Practice-based research.

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Sandra Druskovich

I deeply value the importance of the supervision relationship and the need to provide a safe, supportive space where there is the freedom to openly express your self – with the confidence that your voice will be heard in an empathic, confidential and non-judgemental setting.

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Deanna Hollis

Trauma focused interventions, with a specialist approach to harmful sexual behaviour; risk management and safe practice; leadership and management development; encouraging reflective practice and client centred interventions. The assessment, treatment and case management of harmful sexual behavior in children, youth and adults.

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